Faq's

Since 1995 all regulators (the part that attaches to the gas tank to regulate the flow of gas) have included a safety device that restricts the flow of gas in the event of a gas leak. This safety device can be inadvertently activated in two ways, putting the grill into what is commonly called bypass. The first way for the device to be activated is to leave one or more burner control knobs in the ON position when the LP cylinder valve is opened. The second is not to wait long enough to start the grill after opening the LP cylinder valve. The safety device in the regulator is activated each time that the LP cylinder valve is opened. The device resets itself when the gas pressure equalizes between the closed burner control valve and the regulator, through the hose. If a burner control knob is turned on before the gas pressure can equalize, the device will remain in bypass. The length of time necessary to wait to start the grill after turning on the LP cylinder valve is dependent on the length of the hose and outside air temperature. It is always good practice to wait a few seconds after opening the LP cylinder valve before turning on the burner control knob to start the grill. Keep in mind that the safety device reacts to a gas leak. If a grill is in bypass the gas connections and hose should be tested for leaks with a soap and water solution. If the grill is in bypass, after checking for gas leaks do the following to get the grill out of bypass:

Cart Based Models

  • Close the LP tank valve
  • Turn all burner control knobs to the OFF position
  • Open the grill lid
  • Turn the LP tank valve until it is completely open
  • Wait several seconds
  • Turn the front burner to the HI/Start position
  • Press the igniter until the burner is lit.
  • Turn remaining burners to High
  • Close the lid.
  • The grill should preheat to 500-550 degrees in 10-15 minutes

Weber Q 100 and 200 series with an adapter hose and the Q 300 series.

  • Close the LP tank valve
  • Turn all burner control knobs to the OFF position
  • Open the grill lid
  • Turn the LP tank valve until it is completely open
  • Wait at least 1 minute
  • Turn the burner control knob to Hi/Start
  • Press the igniter to light the burner
  • Turn any remaining burner control knobs to High
  • The grill should preheat to 400-500 degrees in 10-15 minutes
  • * if problem persists, tank adapter hose needs replacement (fuel blockage)

To keep the regulator flow valve from tripping again, when you are done grilling always:

  • Turn off the LP tank valve allowing gas to burn off so hose is empty
  • Turn all burner control knobs to the OFF position
A British Thermal Unit (BTU) is the amount of heat energy needed to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree F. This is the standard measurement used to state the amount of energy that a fuel has as well as the amount of output of any heat generating device. You might be able to imagine it this way. Take one gallon (8 pounds) of water and put it on your stove. If the water it 60 degrees F. and you want to bring it to a boil (212 degrees F.) then you will need about 1,200 BTUs to do this. All combustible materials have a BTU rating. For instance, propane has about 15,000 BTUs per pound. Charcoal has about 9,000 BTUs per pound and wood (dry) has about 7,000 BTUs per pound. This gives you an idea of how much fuel you'd need to cook something.
Not necessarily. BTU's are a measure of the heat output of the barbecue; however they do not tell you what cooking temperature the barbecue will achieve. BTU ratings by themselves are in no way related to cooking performance or the quality of any given product. As long as the barbecue gets hot enough to sear your steaks properly it doesn't matter how many BTU's it takes to get there. The real question to ask is not how many BTU's does it have but, how hot will it get?
Although we consider all cooking grids to be of high quality and performance, cast iron is a much heavier metal then most barbecue cooking grids. Because of its high density it is very effective for searing most meats (such as steak, chicken, and hamburgers). The grids are multi-level and have channeled grooves to allow extra grease and juices to run off.
Just like a cast iron frying pan it is necessary to season, and re-season, cast iron cooking grids. The oil will help protect the porcelain coating, decrease sticking, and protect damaged or worn grids from rusting. Only use household cooking oils (Olive, Vegetable, Peanut, Sunflower, Canola, to name a few).
The push button starting system is a two part system consisting of the push button and the electrode. The button is almost fail safe, if it clicks, then it works. Sometimes the electrode will develop a build up of grease or oxidization that may hamper the performance of the spark. Most times this can be rectified by cleaning the electrode with a brush or carefully with a piece of sandpaper.
Don't worry, its not paint; the inside surfaces of Weber grill lids are not painted, they are coated with baked-on porcelain enamel.
If the unit is propane, then Since 1995 all regulators (the part that attaches to the gas tank to regulate the flow of gas) have included a safety device that restricts the flow of gas in the event of a gas leak. This safety device can be inadvertently activated in two ways, putting the grill into what is commonly called bypass. click here for instructions on how to reset tank safety.
If you have not used your patio heater for awhile, bugs like the smell of the additive they put into gas, so they block the oriface of either the main burner or the pilot assembly.
Barbecues use what they call heat plates these days. Previously you would use ceramic briquettes which were good at the time. The main benefits of a "heat plate" is you get one solid piece of metal to heat up and generate heat. using a plate with one thickness and diameter all the way around the cookbox will produce more even heat and reduce grease fires as the juices vaporize directly onto the heat plate adding flavor to your food.
Make sure the regulator is tightened (by hand) securely to the propane bottle. The black hand-wheel should be hand tight. Make sure all the main burners and side burner are in the OFF position before turning on the propane bottle valve. Try lighting the grill with both the electronic ignitor and a match or butane lighter. If the grill lights with a match, you may have an ignitor problem. If the grill will not match light, then you are not getting propane from the bottle. Try connecting this regulator to a different propane bottle (bottle from a neighbor, etc.) to insure the propane bottle is working properly. If you still cannot light the grill, you probably need another regulator.
The humming you hear is a resonance similar to what you find in a musical instrument. It is caused by small periodic changes of flow across the diaphragm located inside the grill and is more likely to occur when in high flow conditions. The only time this can be harmful to you and/or the product is when there is propane leaking out of the small vented hole on the regulator assembly.